How to boost the AHCI/NVMe performance of Intel Chipset systems

Well I take back what I said earlier, lol it was my overclock that was making the browser act funny I think, not the older driver. I dropped it down to 3.6ghz, instead of working on the voltages, and it cleared right up. I got funny artifacts with both driver versions. I guess my board is getting old and what used to be a solid OC a year ago is no longer solid, or Windows 8.1 is slightly more sensitive than Windows 7 was.

At any rate I am still testing 12.8.10.1005 AHCI drivers. Anyone know how to revert the Intel drivers to the MSAHCI drivers so I can test them please?

Open the "IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers" section of the Device Manager > right click onto the listed Intel SATA AHCI Controller > "Update Driver Software" > "Browse my Computer…" > "Let me pick…" > enable the option "Show compatible hardware" > choose the "Standard SATA AHCI Controller" (= name on Win8 or similar name on Win7) > hit "Next" > "OK"

Fernando, any update on the stability of your driver testing (re: Samsung 840 Pro RAPID + AHCI)?

In your tests, what OROM did you use? Did you juggle OROMs around at all?

When you’re about to test a different OROM/driver, what’s your process of switching? Do you do any special measures of driver removing/cleaning?

I’m contemplating making the jump from 11.2.0.1527/11.2.0.1006 to the latest after seeing your results.


Also, given that my controller is only SATA2, would RAPID mode even have any possible speed benefit for me, or would the SATA2 cap block any increases? I’m unaware of how the mechanics of RAPID mode work, other than some sort of RAM-caching being used. I’m unsure of whether this “bypasses” the SATA2 limit, or if it’d still be capped by SATA2 speeds.

Not yet.

Within the BIOS were the Intel RAID ROM and the Intel UEFI SataDriver v12.7.0.1936, but according to CPL0 the version of these BIOS components doesn’t matter, because they are not used by the system, if the Intel SATA Controller has been set to “AHCI” mode.

I have done it only, when I compared the performance of my previously running RAID0 system.

You can find the exact procedure while doing my AHCI benchmark tests within >this< post.

Since I generally do not install any Intel RST/RST(e) software, when I am running my Samsung 840 PRO SSDs in AHCI mode, there is nothing to remove or to clean. I just updated the AHCI driver manually from within the Device Manager (starting with the generic MS AHCI driver and then going up with the different Intel AHCI driver versions).

I doubt, that you will get a remarkable AHCI performance boost after having updated the Intel RAID ROM version (reason: see above). Furthermore the original Intel RST(e) AHCI driver versions from v12.x.x.xxxx up will not support your Intel ICH10R SATA AHCI Controller.

Although I haven’t tested the Samsung RAPID mode after having connected the Samsung 840 PRO to an Intel SATA2 port, I suspect, that you will get far better benchmark results with enabled Samsung RAPID mode.

Hi guys! :slight_smile:
I write my question in this thread because it’s all about AHCI vs RAID performance, and looked like the best place.
After years running the following setup, I’m now wondering whether it’s really a good choice or not:

Asus Rampage III Extreme (X58 + ICH10R)

Intel ICH10R controller:
Samsung SSD 830 256gb
2 x WD Caviar Black HDD 600gb each in RAID0

Marvell 9123 controller:
(empty)

JMicron JMB36X controller:
Seagate Extreme 2gb (external eSATA port)

With this setup the Intel RST driver loads in RAID mode, because of the HDDs in RAID0 being on the same controller as the SSD. When I initially built the system I didn’t have the SSD yet, so I put my HDDs on the Intel controller and raided them. Then I bought the SSD, and tried to put it on this crappy Marvell controller… As many already know, it’s definitely a piece of crap, even if labelled SATA III vs. the Intel being SATA II. I then moved the SSD to Intel controller, benefiting from way better response ans snappiness.
Considering that my system and programs are all on the SSD now, and I use the RAID0 only for data storage, I thought about moving the RAID0 drives to the Marvell, to allow the Intel controller to run in AHCI mode with the single SSD on it. It’s a PITA, though, as I would have to move all the data, rebuild the array, and move back everything…

What do you think about it?

A RAID0 array is not the best choice for data storage.
So it would be much safer, if you would either create a RAID1 array for data storage (disadvantage: You will loose half of the storage space) or run all your drives in AHCI mode. If I were you, I would choose the latter option and connect the SSD and both HDDs to the on-board Intel SATA ports.

Hi to everyone here:
@ Fernan and @ anyone who might collaborate in this question.

Ok, I own a X99 Deluxe chipset board and I have plans to upgrade my currently (3) drive Raid0 Raid array with a Samsung XP941 M.2 Pci-e SSD to have my system run in AHCI instead of Raid.

Now the question is, which driver of the AHCI versions could I use for best performance in AHCI mode with the Samsung XP941?. Since this SSD can’t use the turbo mode in the Magician Tool software. although it doesn’t need it but it could be awesome to have it as well. But sticking to the question which driver could help best to this SSD form best? The RST 13.5.0.1056 or the RST 4.1.0.1046. TIA everyone.

Since I own a Samsung XP941 myself, I may be able to answer your question.
When I use the Samsung XP941 as system drive (it boots fine with my ASRock Z97 Extreme6 mainboard), the related M.2 PCIe SATA AHCI Controller has the HardwareID PCI\VEN_144D&DEV_A800&CC_0106. The only AHCI driver, which is able to support this HardwareID, is the generic MS AHCI driver. So it is impossible to replace this "Standard" AHCI driver by any other AHCI driver.

Samsung’s latest Magician version not even detects the XP941.

You will not be able to get any Intel AHCI driver installed, because the XP941 cannot be connected with any Intel SATA Controller.

Since I own a Samsung XP941 myself, I may be able to answer your question.
When I use the Samsung XP941 as system drive (it boots fine with my ASRock Z97 Extreme6 mainboard), the related M.2 PCIe SATA AHCI Controller has the HardwareID PCI\VEN_144D&DEV_A800&CC_0106. The only AHCI driver, which is able to support this HardwareID, is the generic MS AHCI driver. So it is impossible to replace this "Standard" AHCI driver by any other AHCI driver.

Samsung’s latest Magician version not even detects the XP941.

You will not be able to get any Intel AHCI driver installed, because the XP941 cannot be connected with any Intel SATA Controller.





well Fernan thanks for answer! I be looking forward to buy this SSD M.2 Pci-e card anyhow, since I can always put a 512 SSD Samsung that for spare to image the M.2 and another 256GB Samsung to setup with Rapid mode for scratch disk and I be all set, TIA guy.

@ all Intel AHCI users:

After having done yesterday some benchmark comparison tests to find out the “best” Intel AHCI driver (look >here<), I decided to completely reconstruct the start post of this thread.

Update of the Start Post

Changelog:

  • new: everything

Have fun with the (hopefully) boosted performance of your Intel AHCI system!
Fernando

As a consequence of >this< thread I have just updated the start post of this thread.


Never ever do this to a SSD! Since a SSD works completly different then a HDD you don’t have to wipe the complete SSD since it doesn’t make any difference. This won’t gain any performance and is simply hurting the SSD. Please don’t do this!


I would not recommend partition a SSD. On a HDD it made sense to do so since the most needed data was written/read first where the HDD was faster. Always do a clean installation. I know that it sometimes is a pain in the ass but this is the only real way to install a new OS and get the best result. From my opinion everything else is just plain bullshit.


You normally don’t need any AntiVirus/AntiTrojan Software: just keep your browser updated, disable Flash and Java and your good. If you relly think you need a Virus Scanner then just stick with the integrated Windows Defender since it is suitable for nearly every user and uses the least amount of performance.


I would also not recommend this since it won’t impact performane in a way that you want this feature. This will just bring more problems with it then you will gain in performance. Just leave it like it is.


It is possible to get these and other related settings back with a neat little registry hack:
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/177…-hipm-dipm.html
http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/507…management.html
http://www.hardwareluxx.de/community/f22…gen-793649.html
But since it won’t help everybody to gain performance just try it for yourself…


Just leave those services running since they normally won’t hurt anybody and you won’t kill the real read/write monsters. For this you have to open the ressource monitor and check for every file .ETL/.EVTX that gets written. Simply end all logging (you have to do this manually…) and all performance counters. This will save you the most reads and write windows does and will gain a lot of performance in write intensive apps.
Also don’t mess with TRIM. You don’t need no extra software. Just install the software that is supplied with your SSD or leave it like it is.

oh and one thing:
NEVER EVER DEFRAG YOUR SSD! NEVER! EVER! It is impossible to defrag a SSD. Just understand how a SSD works if you want to know why.

Never ever do this to a SSD! Since a SSD works completly different then a HDD you don’t have to wipe the complete SSD since it doesn’t make any difference. This won’t gain any performance and is simply hurting the SSD. Please don’t do this!


I do not agree with you.
A secure erasure of the SSD may not be needed for SSDs with an active and good TRIM support, but there are others, who don’t have it.
By the way: I have secure erased my SSDs many times (to be sure, that all cells are free of garbage) and haven’t yet seen any problem caused by this procedure.

Well… then let me get this clear: it is not possible to completely securly erase a SSD. This has nothing to do with TRIM but with the inner workings of an SSD. You could fill the complete SSD (not delete or overwrite!) with data but that won’t guarantee you that everything gets wiped. This is the only and far more better option you could take and really: that doesnt make sense either.

You could securly erase a SSD (via simply filling the whole SSD with random data, not null data!) but it won’t make a difference since you can’t overwrite every block. If you change a file on a SSD and save it, it doesn’t get written to the exact same block it was read from (like on a HDD). TRIM is only a ATA/OS feature which “has nothing to do with the inner workings” of an SSD. Normally you don’t get access to the overprovisioning area which gets used.

And last but not least: why should i ever secure erase a SSD? It won’t make any difference in performance since for the SSD controller the blocks are free anyway. You just say to do it but don’t say why one should do it and how you think the performance/optimization is achieved.

I would really recommend to change this information or better delete it since it is false. If you have plausible information that you could share with me that will get me wrong i will change my mind. But as far as i know and as far as the facts about the inner workings of a SSD are it is not a good advise to secure erase a SSD.

btw: a cell doesnt mind if theres a 0 or 1 in it so there cant be garbage in it. i know that you won’t see any problems with this in the first place but since it is hurting the write cycle that gets increased you will degrade your SSD without any need. and also one other thing: the controller inside a SSD uses a specific algo to get data written (HDDs also have this but there it is working completely different and serves another purpose). So if you only fill your SSD with zeros you won’t end up having a SSD that is filled with zeros :wink:

pps: if you want to destroy the data on a SSD and you could also put it into a oven for one (better two) week(s) with at least 80°C in it. you will end up with a SSD completely filled with garbage.

ppps: the OS specific values for ASPM and LPM won’t work every time since they could be set in the BIOS/UEFI to only accept values from the BIOS/UEFI or the device(s) itself. The options in Windows will then make no change. So it would be good if you add the information to set the correct settings in the BIOS/UEFI first and then use the Windows settings.

So our opinions about the sense and the benefit of a secure erasure of SSDs seems to be quite different.
What I have written within the start post is the way I am trying to boost the performance of my AHCI system and the result of my own intensive tests. That is why I will not delete parts of my recommendations, unless I am really convinced, that they are faulty or useless.
Nevertheless I will add a link to your last statement to my start post. This way I will let the users know, that there are different opinions about the sense and the benefit of a secure erasure of SSDs.

So our opinions about the sense and the benefit of a secure erasure of SSDs seems to be quite different.
What I have written within the start post is the way I am trying to boost the performance of my AHCI system and the result of my own intensive tests. That is why I will not delete parts of my recommendations, unless I am really convinced, that they are faulty or useless.
Nevertheless I will add a link to your last statement to my start post. This way I will let the users know, that there are different opinions about the sense and the benefit of a secure erasure of SSDs.




hehe… sorry… seems a bit aggressiv from me but I can’t understand why and how some of the stated information should boost performance. Some tips are really great and i think that most people don’t know about it.

@ e.v.o:

It would be great, if you would present your own recommendations about how to boost the performance of an AHCI (and RAID0) system.
Then the users will be able to compare the results.

Does this driver improves HDD performance as well? Is it worth to install Intel RST driver for only 2 HDDs?

Why don’t you test it yourself? It is absolutely safe and very easy to change the AHCI driver (e.g. to switch from the MS in-box AHCI driver to an Intel RST one. You can find the Intel AHCI driver, which I recommend to use with different Intel Chipsets, within the start post of >this< thread (look into the table at the bottom).

Anyone know if its possible to get Windows 10 to treat a USB 3.1 SSD (Crucial C300 on a USB 3.1 adapter) to be seen as a Solid State Drive for proper optimization? Just curious if that is possible.