Realtek ALC4050H driver needs modifications

I recently purchased a Lenovo P620 and it has a Realtek ALC 4050H codec. This driver has a D2 power level mode that’s causing audio drop outs because the device goes into D2 sleep mode after 10 seconds and takes a second or so to wake up causing an audio drop out. Windows has a Audio USB 2.0 driver that works and it doesn’t have the D2 power state so it’s doesn’t experience audio drop outs. Realtek software doesn’t recognize it with the Windows driver… having a modified Realtek driver that doesn’t include the D2 power state would be the best solution. Perhaps someone here could modify it or know of another solution.

Lenovo drivers are old (2258/2268).

Try these WHQL drivers v6.3.9600.2290, dated Jun 4, 2021
http://www.mediafire.com/file/dnaedglng5dnf8i

Newest version currently available.

Thank you for your help, I wasn’t aware of these drivers anywhere. I installed them and unfortunately the same problem happens.

The driver goes into D2 sleep mode after 10 seconds and causes an audio drop as it doesn’t go back into the D0 state quickly enough… this takes almost a full second. The Windows Generic USB Audio 2.0 driver doesn’t have the D2 power state and I’ve been using it. Of course the Realtek software doesn’t recognize the rear speaker port using the Windows driver… but I don’t have audio drop outs either.

This why I requested a modified driver for the Realtek audio, there’s no reason to support power mode D2 for an audio device driver.


Then my only suggestion is to disable all USB power management related settings:

- in Power Settings, disable USB selective suspend.

- in Device Manager, find the hub where the Realtek USB audio is connected to, and disable Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power. If this setting is present on the Realtek USB audio device, also disable it.

I’ve been dealing with Lenovo and this Realtek USB driver for some time now… why it supports D2 power state is beyond me. D2 is just like D3 or S3 sleep mode. It takes time to power back on causing the issues… but this thing goes to sleep in 10 seconds. No other driver on the computer uses a D2 power state… either D0 or D3. Any power management settings have no effect on this driver.
I worked with the Realtek driver tool where you can enable different features with a Realtek HDA or UAD driver. Unfortunately this tool doesn’t work with the USB Realtek driver. I have an sound card with a ALC1220 chip and the tool will recognize the device showing its power state of D0.
This means a modified driver will have to done using an editor… I’m not advanced enough to do that. I’m sure someone might have the skills to do so.

I recently purchased a Lenovo P620 and it has a Realtek ALC 4050H codec. This driver has a D2 power level mode that’s causing audio drop outs because the device goes into D2 sleep mode after 10 seconds and takes a second or so to wake up causing an audio drop out. Windows has a Audio USB 2.0 driver that works and it doesn’t have the D2 power state so it’s doesn’t experience audio drop outs. Realtek software doesn’t recognize it with the Windows driver… having a modified Realtek driver that doesn’t include the D2 power state would be the best solution. Perhaps someone here could modify it or know of another solution.

you did not mention in your first post what version of Windows you were using when you have these problems on your Lenovo P620, HHH03? please list what Windows version you have installed on your Lenovo computer

I’m using Windows 11 22623.875 currently. When I started this thread, it was Windows 11 21H1 I was using. The current Realtek driver for the ALC4050H has fixed the truncated audio problem by delaying sound until the device has switched on to D0 power state… the popping still exists because it’s still using D2 state after ten seconds of idle time.
Most Realtek Audio devices (sound cards and most motherboards) don’t ever use D2 power state even though they support it… but these aren’t USB Audio devices either.

It can be made to work correctly because if you use the generic Windows USB 2.0 Audio driver… these problems don’t exist anymore.