[HowTo] Get full NVMe Support for all Systems with an AMI UEFI BIOS

Hi. I just wanted to update >this< post, maybe someone will find it insightful.

The issue was the Crucial P5 nvme drive. These drives are being reported as incompatible with some (esp older) motherboards.
I recently bought Samsung 980 and installed it in my ASUS Z9PR-D12 and it worked straight away. Bios was modded as per guide and booting is possible from the nvme.
I could not get the Crucial drive to work in this mobo - I spent few days trying different configurations to no avail.

Also I was able to successfully BIOS mod Asrock FM2A78M-HD+ and got it to work with Crucial P5 Drive.
One note though about this motherboard - I was not able to flash the bios using any of the software tools. Seen number of different errors. I had to resort to buying CH341a bios flashing tool. It was only a few bucks and I like to have this for fixing bricked mobo’s/routers/GPU’s.

Thank you Win-Raid Forums.

Edit by Fernando: Fully quoted post replaced by a link to it (to save space)

Hey, I have an aimb-274 motherboard, I was able to correctly modify the bios. I use a mini pcie -> nvme adapter to connect the disk. I have a question. After connecting the Samsung 970 evo plus drive, after installing the system, I can boot from it without any problem. On the other hand, after connecting, for example, SanDisk extreme pro, the motherboard does not start at all. Someone has encountered such a problem. What do you think could be the reason?

@mack Welcome to the Win-RAID Forum!
It is fine, that you succeeded and now are able to boot off an NVMe SSD.
Your reported issue can have several reasons, but doesn’t indicate, that you have done something wrong.
What happens, if you connect the device after having booted?
Regards
Dieter (alias Fernando)

@Fernando ,
Thanks for the welcome :slight_smile:

1. I run the motherboard without hard drives connected
2. I run the bios
3. I connect the SSD drive
4. I put a pendrive with linux
5. Abandon the changes and go out in biose
6. Linux starts from pendrive
But it’s very slow, the kernel is loading very slowly.
Linux disk not detected
In addition to Sandisk, I have another SSD drive, after inserting it into the adapter, the computer does not start, the fan starts, but nothing happens.
However, it works with Samsung 970 evo plus and I also have Union Memory 128gb NVMe which also works

@mack
This is the thread about how to be able to boot a modern Windows OS off an NVMe SSD with a system without native NVMe BIOS support. The behaviour of Linux may be different.

Maybe both devices are connected to ports, which use the same data transfer lanes. In this case you should try to connect them to other ports/slots.

@Fernando
I discovered one more thing
I run the motherboard, go to the bios, connect the disk, choose Save changes and exit, the motherboard restarts and the disk is already detected. When I just do ctrl + alt + delete instead of saving the changes, the drive is not detected.


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I would like to add that today I bought a PCIe x16 to NVME adapter. In this adapter, all the NVME disks I have are working properly and I can boot the system from them. Unfortunately still in the mini PCIE port with some NVME disks the motherboard won’t boot. I think if, for example, the problem is not the high power consumption of some drives.

Could you dump your bios (full bios image) and post it here?

@Koekieezz
To whom did you address your recent question? Nobody will be notified about it.

…"Who cares… im just collecting"

Hi, just registered to the forum for this thread.

Before going through the OP carefully, i wanted to ask if i can mod the following system to boot from my Samsung MZALQ128HBHQ PM991 128GB M.2 NVME 2242 SSD:

Asus Z10PA-D8 with latest BIOS, C612 chipset.

Edit: i want to boot latest Linux kernel (Proxmox)

Thx

This motherboard model (Asus Z10PA-D8 bios v3208) has already the AMI NVMe dxe module in it by default in latest bios, no need mod for NVME.

EDIT: In older bios 3701: “1. Support ASUS NVMe devices display in post screen”
With this Asus is stating one of two options or both, NVMe drives as data storage or/and boot volumes.

Now the rest is up to system configuration, also motherboard boot manager in bios may only display NVMe boot volumes when an OS is installed on it.

EDIT: Or incompatible NVMe disk to this motherboard/Not empty/Bad

Do note, that a full UEFI motherboard configuration is needed for UEFI OS/NVMe correct install/boot, not AUTO/CSM (Legacy), in this modes NVMe drives are treated as standard storage devices.
(4.4.9 on the user guide)
This also means that other attached cards like GPU must support EFI protocol. Its all in Fernando’s guide on 1st post.

Just noticed that the M.2 slot, supports PCI or SATA devices but it has only a x1 connection to the C612 PCH…your not going to get a full performance output from a regular NVMe drive (PCIe 2.0-3.0-4.0 @ x1x 2 x4)

Good luck

Oh… i don’t see the drive in boot options though… just now got a CPU installed and the system booted first time, so i need to play around with BIOS more… Thanks for the info!

“NVME Controller and drive information” in BIOS is empty… bad drive?

edit 2: Oh right, might not show up unless there’s something installed. Thx.

edit 3: ok, very helpful. been a long day but next step tomorrow is booting debian live and test if it sees the drive, and/or try installing an OS. The nvme drive is new/unused

@MeatWar

Yes i know it’s only x1, but still better than SATA for booting Proxmox hypervisor in terms of responsiveness i’d imagine… The drive hosting VM’s will run on a separate Intel DC P3700 MLC drive.
If all fails i’ll just get a SATA drive though.

Edit by Fernando: Unneeded part of the fully quoted post and blank lines removed (to save space)

Hi,

First: Thanks :slight_smile: Using the instructions from the first post, I successfully installed NvmExpressDxe_5.ffs into the BIOS of my ASUS UX501JW and now I’m using it again with NVMe drive. Many thanks for the manual, because this model only supports “PCIe AHCI” drives, and without mods, I couldn’t install the system anymore - the original M.2 drive was broken.

OK. But I am writing because the following few words may be useful to someone (but maybe someone wrote it before in more than 7k above posts …):

Even with a modified BIOS, I still had a problem: I couldn’t install Windows 10 21H2 because in UEFI mode the installation got stuck when changing the graphics mode (probably the source of the problem was the Intel UHD + GTX 960M tandem). So the situation was as follows: the disk was seen in the BIOS, but it was not possible to install Windows in MBR mode (there was information about the inability to boot the system in this mode) and in UEFI mode the installer crashed. But I saw before that the disk is visible by Macrium Reflect run from Rescue Media.

So I made the following procedure (a little workaround): I’ve made Windows 10 machine in VirtualBox with EFI enabled. Then I started Windows 10 install from ISO. Before the first restart I turned off the machine. Next I made the image of virtual disk (GPT one was created) using Macrium Reflect. And I restored it to my laptop. And … the laptop successfully booted into the Windows 10 installer, the installation of which continued. Now everything works great :slight_smile:

Regards,
Marcin

Hi,

First: Thanks :slight_smile: Using the instructions from the first post, I successfully installed NvmExpressDxe_5.ffs into the BIOS of my ASUS UX501JW and now I’m using it again with NVMe drive. Many thanks for the manual, because this model only supports “PCIe AHCI” drives, and without mods, I couldn’t install the system anymore - the original M.2 drive was broken.

OK. But I am writing because the following few words may be useful to someone (but maybe someone wrote it before in more than 7k above posts …):

Even with a modified BIOS, I still had a problem: I couldn’t install Windows 10 21H2 because in UEFI mode the installation got stuck when changing the graphics mode (probably the source of the problem was the Intel UHD + GTX 960M tandem). So the situation was as follows: the disk was seen in the BIOS, but it was not possible to install Windows in MBR mode (there was information about the inability to boot the system in this mode) and in UEFI mode the installer crashed. But I saw before that the disk is visible by Macrium Reflect run from Rescue Media.

So I made the following procedure (a little workaround): I’ve made Windows 10 machine in VirtualBox with EFI enabled. Then I started Windows 10 install from ISO. Before the first restart I turned off the machine. Next I made the image of virtual disk (GPT one was created) using Macrium Reflect. And I restored it to my laptop. And … the laptop successfully booted into the Windows 10 installer, the installation of which continued. Now everything works great :slight_smile:

Regards,
Marcin

@marcinkk Welcome to the Win-RAID Forum and thanks for your report inclusive workaround.
As you have already suspected, your boot problem has been caused by the Graphics Card (maybe forced by the in-use Windows OS) and has nothing to do with the insertion of the NVMe BIOS module into the BIOS.
Enjoy the speed of your NVMe SSD by using it now as bootable system drive!
Dieter (alias Fernando)

P.S.: On your request I have moved your post into this thread and deleted the one you had created.

Hello.
I have a motherboard Asrock 970 extreme 4. It has not support for NVME. I’m searching to modded BIOS but I did not find.
I Discovery this forum., thanks to God.
Anybody help me???
Excuse my english. I’m from Spain.
Thanks.

@jgvega Welcome to the Win-RAID Forum!
Within the start post of this thread is a detailed guide about how to succeed.
If you are unsure regarding the quality of your BIOS modification, attach a link to your work (and add the original BIOS as well). Then we will do a look into the modded BIOS and tell you, whether it is ready for being flashed or not.
Good luck!
Dieter (alias Fernando)

@Koekieezz
Thanks for having instantly replied to jgvega’s request and for having already offered the modded BIOS. I have moved your post into the better matching “Offers: Already modded special BIOSes” Sub-Forum.
Reason:
This thread has been designed just for users, who are able and willing to do the BIOS modification themselves by following my guide. Users, who want to get an already NVMe modded BIOS, should search for the requested BIOS within the above mentioned Sub-Forum and - if they don’t find it there - post their request into the “BIOS Modding Requests” Sub-Forum.
This procedure makes it much easier for other interested users with a similar mainboard to find the requested modded BIOS.

@jgvega
This thread should not been used for “BIOS Modding Requests”, but only for users, who want to know how the BIOS modification can be done and to try to do it themselves (the modification is not risky at all, the risky part is the flashing of a modded BIOS).
If you should not want to follow my guide and to try the (easy) BIOS modification yourself, please look >here<, where our Forum member Koekiezz has attached the specific BIOS, which has been modded by him.
Good luck!
Dieter (alias Fernando)

I know this thread is old, but it comes up in all search engines about NVMe support for older mobos and I just struggled for almost a day to get it to work.

The first post and most (if not all) other posts I found on the web are missing a key set of requirements:

Your NVMe disk must be GPT (not MBR) and must have a FAT32 partition marked ESP (EFI) and also Bootable at the beginning of the disk.

If you don’t do that, then you won’t see the disk in the BIOS to choose from at boot, no matter what you try.

Simply converting your MBR disk to GPT will not be sufficient for the BIOS to show the NVMe disk in the boot list. After you create the FAT32 partition, you can use all sort of tools to “repair” your boot, depending on the OS. For Windows there are a ton that you can run from a bootable UEFI USB stick (must be UEFI!), including the native bootbcd, or Macrium, etc.

Perhaps Fernando can add this to the 1st post.

My story: I had a 512GB ssd initialized as MBR (I always avoided UEFI as it always gave me headaches). I cloned that SSD onto my newly purchased Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe.